Sometimes It’s Necessary To Retreat

Richard's Wall Articles

From about 1992 till 2005, I wrote well over 300 articles on the history of my old hometown of Lincoln Park. These articles were published in various regional weekly newspapers. The most recent articles of any given month, went on display at the Lincoln Park Museum.

Sometimes It’s Necessary To Retreat

By Richard Mabey Jr.

From about 1992 till 2005, I wrote well over 300 articles on the history of my old hometown of Lincoln Park. It was a labor of love. These articles were published in various regional weekly newspapers. At any given time, a couple of dozen of my most recent articles would be on display at the infamous Lincoln Park Museum.

The town of Lincoln Park was originally known as Beavertown. Hence the historical society is known as the Beavertown Historical Society. It was around 2004, that a lot of new people joined the Beavertown Historical Society. Some of the people were nice, but a lot of the newer people were very critical, harshly critical, of how things were being done.

At the time, I was serving as President of the Beavertown Historical Society and a lot of arrows were being slung at me. At first, I thought it was sincere criticism coming from people who earnestly wanted to have a better historical society. But then, as the criticisms and fault-finding got crueler and meaner, I knew that the newer members were carrying a lot of negative baggage.

One evening, I had to work late, so I wasn’t able to make the meeting which began at seven-thirty. In my absence, the new people voted to take down all of my historical articles. They did not have anything special in mind to put in that space. They simply did not like my articles.

So, the vote passed. At the end of the meeting they took down my articles, ripped them up and threw them in the garbage can. Needless to say, I knew I really wasn’t welcome there any more.

In many ways, I consider that cruel act as a blessing. It began to show me that Lincoln Park was changing. It was rapidly losing its Mayberry feeling. I began to see the light. In my heart of hearts, I knew greater blessings for me lie in moving on.

And, for me, greater blessings did lie ahead in a new place. I moved to a small town in Central Pennsylvania. I soon landed a job writing for a large daily newspaper, which was published in a nearby city. I wrote a daily message of inspiration for a Christian publishing firm. The daily inspirational messages were emailed to the long list of subscribers, for that service. I also began work on a ghost write of a book on spiritual healing for a local doctor.

When people begin to treat you cruelly and it is unjustified, that is just the time that you need to stand tall and proud. Towns and cities often change in their conscious attitudes. Their cultures go through evolutions. Often times, it is not for the good.

There may come a time, for your own spiritual and creative growth, that it is best to move on. Sometimes, the best thing that you can do for yourself is simply say farewell to the town or city that you are living in, if you become the victim of unjustified criticism and cruelty.

Loyalty is a good quality. But so is looking out for what’s best for your own creative and economic growth. For truly, sometimes the best thing you can do, is just say fare-thee-well to cruel and hurtful people.

Peace and harmony,

Richard

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This entry was posted in Central Pennsylvania, Determination, Dreams, Encouragement, Faith, Finding Your Purpose in Life, Life's Dreams, Memory, Modern Life, Moving On, Newspapers, Small Town America, Spiritual Lesson, Surviving Prejudice, Wisdom. Bookmark the permalink.

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