Marcia Woolery’s Vital Role in Television History

Marcia Woolery’s Vital Role in Television History

By Richard Mabey Jr.

Marcia Woolery was John Boy’s first true love on The Waltons television series. Marcia was brilliantly portrayed by the very talented actress, Tammi Bula. Richard Thomas and Tammi Bula had a most incredible chemistry. There was something that spoke gently of the innocence of first love.

One of the most memorable and heart-warming scenes of all The Waltons episodes is when John Boy reads poetry to Marcia at the school playground. This quality of honesty, innocence and the pains of a first love, really was never quite demonstrated in television history, before this sensitive and endearing scene.

Sure, we had Wally Cleaver share an ice cream soda with Mary Ellen Rodgers. But, Wally had this air of confidence about him. After all he was a popular boy in his high school and played baseball on the high school team. Wally may have stuttered and stammered a bit, when he talked to Mary Ellen, but still the television viewer really didn’t feel Wally’s pain of putting himself out there, to the girl of his dreams.

Mickey Rooney came close to touching our hearts with that certain quality of vulnerability in his many films, portraying Andy Hardy. But, again, there was not that certain feeling of coming of age that Richard Thomas and Tammi Bula touched our hearts with, in their roles of John Boy and Marsha.

“The Foundling” was the very first episode of The Waltons. It aired in September of 1972. And, it is in this episode that we are introduced to Marcia Woolery. Remembering back that we were first introduced to John Boy, in December of 1971 with the television movie, “The Homecoming.”

I remember that in September of 1972, I had just turned 19 and began my sophomore year of college. There was a girl in my American Literature, to whom I had the most painful crush on. We sat across from each other and I remember it took all of my courage to talk to her after class and walk to the student center with her.

So, when I first saw the episode, “The Foundling,” where John Boy reads poetry to Marcia Woolery, it struck a deep chord in the innermost chambers of my heart. The chemistry between John Boy and Marcia just seemed to pour forth from the television screen. The scene was so well done. There was such an endearing sensitivity to the scene. It was just so gentle and caring. There was such a timeless quality about that scene.

I cannot say that I have ever seen that quality of the innocence of the first love of coming of age, ever portrayed with such sensitivity in a television show, as Richard Thomas and Tammi Bulla had so very thoughtfully and skillfully portrayed it. Truly, this gentle scene was a monumental moment in television history.  

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

The Great Comic Book Show Is Coming!

The Great Comic Book Show Is Coming!

By Richard Mabey Jr.

Mark your calendar for the biggest and greatest comic book show of Central Florida is coming around again. Yes! You guessed it! It’s the one and only Comic Book Connection Magnificent Show! What is, no doubt, the all-time best place to get really good deals on comic books.

When is it, you are no doubt asking yourself. Well, it’s this month! September 19th and 20th to be exact. In good old, down-home Weirsdale. The times are from 9:00 in the morning till 3:00 in the afternoon. For more details for the location click onto:

https://www.thecomicbookconnection.com/schedule

One of the things that I love about the CBC Comic Book Show in Weirsdale is the down-home atmosphere. This comic book festival is held outside and not in some stuffy hotel banquet room. You get to feel the warmth of the sun, the touch of a gentle breeze and that wonderful open air feeling, as you go through boxes and boxes of 50 cent comic book boxes!

No, that’s not a misprint! There will be dozens and dozens of boxes of 50 cent comic books! At the last CBC Comic Book Show, I hit the jackpot! I found four of the old Dick Tracy comic books from the 1980’s. These are kind of hard to find, let alone find for 50 cents each. What the publisher did was to reprint both, the daily and the Sunday comic strips from the 1950’s that appeared in newspapers. They really are unique comic books. And, it’s fun to see what was looked upon as futuristic in the 1950’s!

What makes the CBC Comic Book Show unique is the fellowship. For one weekend, you get to leave political differences at home. For in comic book world, there is no Republican or Democrat, no left wing or right wing. There’s just a group of people gathering, who all love comic book!

Plus, people help each other out. At the last CBC Comic Book Show, there was a fellow there who was looking for Green Lantern comic books. Well, guess what happened? There were four or five of us there, who helped him with his cause. Every time one of us would find a Green Lantern, we would hand it to the chap who loved Green Lantern comic books.

Aside from the rows and rows of 50 cent boxes, the CBC Comic Book Show features a great selection of high-end Silver Age and Bronze Age comic books. Joe Peace, the host of this wonderful comic book show, does not believe in gouging. If you’re looking for Silver Age comic books, you’ll get a good deal at the CBC Comic Show.

So, mark your calendar, and come on out to Weirsdale on September 19th and 20th. You’ll be so glad you did. It might be a bit of a ride from where you are, but I can tell with great assurance, it’s well worth it!

Posted in Accomplishment, Acts of Kindness, Avengers, Central Florida, Comic Book Show, Comic Books, Compassion, Destiny, Determination, Encouragement, Friendship, Giving, Kindness, Old Books | Leave a comment

My Days as Troop Quartermaster

My Days as Troop Quartermaster

By Richard Mabey Jr.

In February of 1967, I became the Quartermaster of Boy Scout Troop 170. I was 13 years old and in the eighth grade. Becoming the Troop Quartermaster, was a big step in my life. The Troop Quartermaster is, for the most part, an underrated Warrant Officer of a scout troop. For the Quartermaster is in charge of keeping inventory, maintenance and upkeep of all the scout troop’s equipment, including the tents and cooking equipment.

I loved being the Troop Quartermaster. I learned so very much from it. I was a Star Scout at the time and in order for a scout to earn the rank of Life Scout, one of the requirements is that he must serve in a leadership role in his scout troop. So, for me, it was very important for me to do a good job in serving as the Troop Quartermaster, if I wanted to become a Life Scout.

When I was 13, I was a very shy boy. I was not very good at sports. And, I had just recovered from a year-long bout with rheumatic fever. So, Troop Quartermaster was a perfect fit for me to have a golden opportunity to grow in leadership skills.

One of the innovations that I set up for Boy Scout Troop 170, was a system to better coordinate the storage of the tents, tent poles and tent stakes. I set up a color code system for the tenting equipment. I remember this all so very well. On the right-hand side of the bottom flooring of each tent, I painted a filled-in colored circle. Say, a yellow circle. Then on every one of the tent poles, for that tent, I painted a yellow line around each tent pole. Then I went on to paint a yellow line around the tent stakes for that tent. Hence, the Badger Patrol would always get the yellow tent on all the troop campouts and big camporees.

I am very proud to say that this system that I developed was adopted by other scout troops in Lincoln Park and also in the neighboring towns. It was kind of a mark for me. I had independently developed an intelligent system to solve a long-standing problem of how the troop tenting equipment could be better coordinated.

This method of quietly thinking out a solution to a problem, would help me in my schoolwork, especially in my math and science courses. It would also help me in my work life. Just to be quiet and still, to analyze, to think out a solution to a given problem; by myself, without the help of another person became one of my inner strengths. And, that method of problem solving developed in my role as Troop Quartermaster, when I was 13 years old.

I know scouting has gotten a bum rap lately. And, I do not support. nor defend the horrific recent findings about the darker side of scouting. Still, in spite of all these negative reports about scouting, it is still a good medium for a boy to develop leadership skills. I would say that the best thing to do. is for a father to become a scout leader in his son’s scout troop. This way, a father can have a first-hand say in how that scout troop is run. It is a very good investment in time. And, it allows a father to have time to spend with his son in the great outdoors, hiking and camping in a forest setting.

Yes, scouting has faults. But, it also has good qualities. And, yes it needs to be revamped. But, truly, it can be an outstanding vehicle for the long trail that a young boy walks along to become a forthright man.

Posted in 1967, Accomplishment, Acts of Kindness, Be Strong!, Believe in yourself!, Boy Scout Troop 170, Boy Scouts, Boyhood Days, Compassion, Dad, Destiny, Determination, Divine Protection, Eagle Scout, Encouragement, Faith, From boyhood to manhood, Humility, Kindness, Leadership, Lincoln Park, Memory, Never give up!, New Jersey, NJ, Nostalgia, Quartermaster, Sacrifice, Small Town America, Spiritual Lesson, Stand Tall, Wisdom | Leave a comment

My Week as Mayor of Lincoln Park

My Week as Mayor of Lincoln Park

By Richard Mabey Jr.

February eighth of 1971 was a day that would forever change my life. From that point on, my life would never be the same. For it was on that Monday evening, that I addressed the Town Council and residents of Lincoln Park as their Mayor. This was not a joke. Back in 1971, there were four Boy Scout Troops in Lincoln Park: Troops 70, 76, 170 and 216. Every scout in all four of these Boy Scout Troops casted a vote for the scout who would serve as Scout Mayor during Boy Scout Week, which began on Sunday, February seventh and ended on Saturday, February thirteenth.

The Honorable William A. Dixon was Mayor of Lincoln Park at the time. I had the high honor to spend that Monday, February eighth, with Mayor Dixon from early morning till the close of the Town Council meeting that evening. A lot of my friends at school thought this was a big joke. A lot of my relatives thought that it was cute. But, I assure you, this was very real. It was very, very real.

I sat behind the Mayor’s desk that day. Mayor Dixon sat beside me at that desk and guided me through the day. I took all the Mayor’s telephone calls that day. In the course of the day, Mayor Dixon explained in detail the duties and responsibilities entailed in being the Mayor of Lincoln Park. I learned more in that one day, about small-town government, than I did in taking two years of United States history at Boonton High School. It was truly a very high honor and a golden opportunity to learn about the governmental procedures of my dear old hometown.

I am proud to say that my fellow scouts, who were serving as Town Councilmen and myself made some recommendations, which were enacted upon, in the Borough of Lincoln Park. Some of them I still remember. They may seem like small potatoes now, but the fact that a group of Boy Scouts were actually allowed to have a very real say in local town government was quite a phenomenon.

At the baseball field at Chapel Hill School, there was no garbage can along side the bleachers behind the first base line. We put in a recommendation to have a garbage can, with a swiveling top, placed there, and it was so enacted upon.

Also, the big swing set in the old park where Chapel Hill School met Boonton Avenue needed to be anchored down. At the time, there were six swings on that large swing set apparatus and if children and young people were on all six swings at one time, the rear bars would slightly rise up, creating a bit of a safety hazard. I am proud to say that due to our recommendation, all the bars on the big swing set were anchored down with cement.

I am pretty sure that it was where Skyline Drive met Boonton Avenue, that as a motorist approached Boonton Avenue, there was a lot of high shrubbery that kind of blocked the driver’s view to his left-hand side. We recommended that the shrubbery be trimmed so that that a driver had a better view of upcoming traffic on Boonton Avenue. And, that recommendation was acted upon. There were some more recommendations that we made and the majority of them were acted upon.

I remember, oh so well, those 15 minutes or so before the Town Council meeting began. I was a nervous wreck. I trembled within. I made Barney Fife look cool, calm and collected. The Borough Chambers were filled to standing room only, with a lot of people standing in the back of the room. My mom and dad and my sister, Patti, were among the townspeople present. I remember that my hands actually shook, I was so nervous. But Mayor Dixon told me to relax and to just be myself and everything would be okay.

So, at the age of 17, I was running the entire Town Council Meeting. This was no joke. This was the real thing. I remember when the meeting first began, I stuttered a bit. Then, about 10 minutes into the meeting, I was in full command. This was my moment and I had worked very hard to earn this glorious moment.

In order to have the day off from school, I was required to write a report about my day as Mayor for my U. S. History II class. I remember that I got an A on that report. Mr. Winters, my history teacher wrote in red pen, on the last page of my report, that he actually learned some things about small town government, from reading my report. I remember how deeply honored I was that he wrote that.

It wasn’t all peaches and cream. My picture made the front page of the old Lincoln Park Herald. A lot of my fair weathered friends at school, mocked and ridiculed me. They said things like “here comes the boy sprout mayor,” and other cruel and crude remarks. It hurt me deeply. I think that when all was said and done, that they were just a little bit jealous of my accomplishment. High school kids can be very cruel.

I am immensely grateful to Mayor Dixon for all he taught me about small town government that day in February, nearly 50 years ago. Mayor Dixon is in Heaven now. At 66, I now recognize a debt I can never repay. I do my best to be true to the values of selfless service to others that Mayor Dixon lived all his life. He was truly a good man.

Posted in 1971, Accomplishment, Acts of Kindness, Be Strong!, Beaver Patrol, Beavertown, Believe in yourself!, Boonton, Boonton High School, Boy Scout Troop 170, Boy Scouts, Boyhood Days, Compassion, Destiny, Determination, Divine Protection, Dreams, Eagle Scout, Encouragement, Faith, Finding Your Purpose in Life, Friendship, From boyhood to manhood, Giving, Homecoming, Humility, Journey to Truth, Leadership, Life's Dreams, Lincoln Park, Love one another, Mayor William A. Dixon, Memory, My Old New Jersey Home, Never give up!, New Jersey, NJ, Nostalgia, Old Beavertown, Old Lincoln Park, Spiritual Lesson, Stand Tall, Troop 170, Wisdom | 1 Comment

My Days as Troop Quartermaster

My Days as Troop Quartermaster

By Richard Mabey Jr.

In February of 1967, I became the Quartermaster of Boy Scout Troop 170. I was 13 years old and in the eighth grade. Becoming the Troop Quartermaster, was a big step in my life. The Troop Quartermaster is, for the most part, an underrated Warrant Officer of a scout troop. For the Quartermaster is in charge of keeping inventory, maintenance and upkeep of all the scout troop’s equipment, including the tents and cooking equipment.

Dad and I, when I was 13.

I loved being the Troop Quartermaster. I learned so very much from it. I was a Star Scout at the time and in order for a scout to earn the rank of Life Scout, one of the requirements is that he must serve in a leadership role in his scout troop. So, for me, it was very important for me to do a good job in serving as the Troop Quartermaster, if I wanted to become a Life Scout.

My official Quartermaster Warrant Officer certificate. 

When I was 13, I was a very shy boy. I was not very good at sports. And, I had just recovered from a year-long bout with rheumatic fever. So, Troop Quartermaster was a perfect fit for me to have a golden opportunity to grow in leadership skills.

Dad and I (on the right hand side) hiking the Appalachian Trail with Boy Scout Troop 170.

One of the innovations that I set up for Boy Scout Troop 170, was a system to better coordinate the storage of the tents, tent poles and tent stakes. I set up a color code system for the tenting equipment. I remember this all so very well. On the right-hand side of the bottom flooring of each tent, I painted a filled-in colored circle. Say, a yellow circle. Then on every one of the tent poles, for that tent, I painted a yellow line around each tent pole. Then I went on to paint a yellow line around the tent stakes for that tent. Hence, the Badger Patrol would always get the yellow tent on all the troop campouts and big camporees.

I am very proud to say that this system that I developed was adopted by other scout troops in Lincoln Park and also in the neighboring towns. It was kind of a mark for me. I had independently developed an intelligent system to solve a long-standing problem of how the troop tenting equipment could be better coordinated.

This method of quietly thinking out a solution to a problem, would help me in my schoolwork, especially in my math and science courses. It would also help me in my work life. Just to be quiet and still, to analyze, to think out a solution to a given problem; by myself, without the help of another person became one of my inner strengths. And, that method of problem solving developed in my role as Troop Quartermaster, when I was 13 years old.

I know scouting has gotten a bum rap lately. And, I do not support. nor defend the horrific recent findings about the darker side of scouting. Still, in spite of all these negative reports about scouting, it is still a good medium for a boy to develop leadership skills. I would say that the best thing to do. is for a father to become a scout leader in his son’s scout troop. This way, a father can have a first-hand say in how that scout troop is run. It is a very good investment in time. And, it allows a father to have time to spend with his son in the great outdoors, hiking and camping in a forest setting.

Yes, scouting has faults. But, it also has good qualities. And, yes it needs to be revamped. But, truly, it can be an outstanding vehicle for the long trail that a young boy walks along to become a forthright man.

Posted in 1967, Accomplishment, Acts of Kindness, Appalachian Trail, Be Strong!, Believe in yourself!, Boy Scout Troop 170, Boy Scouts, Boyhood Days, Compassion, Dad, Destiny, Determination, Divine Protection, Dreams, Encouragement, Faith, From boyhood to manhood, Humility, I Remember Dad, Journey to Truth, Kindness, Leadership, Life's Dreams, Lincoln Park, Love one another, Mabey History, Memory, Never give up!, New Jersey, NJ, Nostalgia, Quartermaster, Spiritual Lesson, Stand Tall, To thine own self be true., Wisdom | Leave a comment

Farewell February

Farewell February

By Richard Mabey Jr.

It is time to say farewell to February. It’s been a rough month for me. I am still in deep mourning for the loss of my Mom. Life is so tough at times. I’m at that stage where people are telling me that I should be over my Mom’s loss by now. Sadly, even people in my church are telling me this.

Today was a tough day for me. I think I saw my Mom in every nook and cranny in my home today. My Mom lived with me. We lived in one of these big gated communities in Central Florida. I think that moving to Florida was the single biggest mistake that I ever made in my entire life.

I used to work as a Gate Guard. If you have read my older blogs, you’re no doubt aware of that. But as Happy Land (the fictional name of the gated community that I live in) has grown and grown in size, it seems that the people living here and visiting here have just gotten, well, they have just gotten plain meaner.

My sister, Patti, and I went to the little grocery store in Wildwood today. I’ll call the store, Grocery World, so I don’t get sued. I asked the Produce Manager, David, if he needed helpers for the produce department. David told me that now that the snowbirds are all going home, the store isn’t hiring right now.

For tonight’s blog, I posted a photo of my Mom with Donald Duck. It was taken at Disney World. It was a magical moment. This photo was taken during the Summer of 1994. It was such a wonderful time. We used to fly down from New Jersey to Disney World for about a week. We had a lot of fun. They were good times. I miss those good times very much.

I once had a fantastic job, working in the International Public Relations Department of a huge conglomerate phone company. I’m sure you can guess which one I worked at. I’ll call it Amalgamated Consolidated. They were good times. The money was rolling in and I really did think that it was never gonna end. But alas, I got old. I’m now 66. And, I am starting to feel old.

Well, I’ll sign off for tonight. Tomorrow is Sunday. I go to Sunday School and church on Sunday mornings. I have to leave my house at about 8:30 in the morning, so I have to get up early tomorrow morning.

Well, as dear old Roy Rogers would say as he ended his old TV show, happy trails to you!

Posted in 1994, Acts of Kindness, Amalgamated Consolidated, Be Strong!, Believe in yourself!, Broken Heart, Compassion, Destiny, Determination, Divine Protection, Encouragement, Faith, Finding Your Purpose in Life, Florida, Giving, Healing, Homecoming, Humility, Journey to Truth, Kindness, Life's Dreams, Love of Family, Love one another, Memory, Mom, Never give up!, New Jersey, NJ, Nostalgia, Sacrifice, Stand Tall, Walt Disney World | Tagged | Leave a comment

I Remember Mom: Setting Mom’s Hair

I Remember Mom:

Setting Mom’s Hair

By Richard Mabey Jr.

Two months have passed since Mom went Home to be with the Lord. My grief is still painfully deep. I miss her so very much. In the past three or four years, I used to set Mom’s hair, for her, on Saturday afternoons. This was our ritual to prepare Mom for Sunday morning church service.

Mom had her hair curlers incredibly organized. She had three different little plastic boxes for her curlers. There was a box for the small curlers, a box for the medium curlers and a box for the large curlers. Likewise, Mom had her bobby pins well organized as well. The large bobby pins were kept at the bottom of the plastic box where she kept the large curlers. And, of course the small bobby pins were kept with the small curlers.

The entire process, from start to finish, to put Mom’s hair in curlers took me about 45 minutes. It was a special little time.

Mom would often say to me, “you got this curler a little too loose, maybe you outa redo it, make it tighter.” And, of course that is exactly what I would do.

One time when I was setting Mom’s hair, I noticed that she was holding back tears. She told me the story of when Dad and her first started courting. It was a cute story. Mom laughed at how nervous Dad was when he first met her Dad.

“You should have seen your father when he first met your grandfather. He was a nervous wreck. He was jumping around, so nervous, like he was Barney Fife.”

That was a precious little moment. I cherish that simple memory.

I’m rather tired tonight. My sister, Patti, and I are working on setting up for a garage sale that we are going to have in the middle of March. Garage sales are a lot of work.

Well, I’ll close for tonight. It’s getting late. At 66, when the clock passes 9:30, that is incredibly late. So, I think I’ll hit the hay.

If you’re reading this tonight, or any night for that matter, before going to sleep, I hope you have sweet dreams.

Posted in Acts of Kindness, Be Strong!, Believe in yourself!, Broken Heart, Compassion, Destiny, Determination, Divine Protection, Encouragement, Faith, Finding Your Purpose in Life, Grandpa Kemmerer, Healing, Humility, Kindness, Love of Family, Love one another, Memory, Mom, Mourning, Spiritual Lesson, The Unexplained, To thine own self be true. | Tagged | Leave a comment

I Remember Mom

I Remember Mom

By Richard Mabey Jr.

Just two days before this past Christmas, my Mom went Home to be with the Lord. It has been a very, very sad time for me. My Mom died from complications of the TAVR heart surgery. The surgeons sliced her Ascending Aorta and she basically bled to death. A word to the wise: beware of the medical profession.

My Mom was such a kind, sweet, caring, loving woman. I miss her so very much. Right now, as I am writing these words, tears flow down my cheeks. Mourning is a most painful emotion to endure. It truly is.

This is a short blog, I know. I will write more about Mom later. But right now, I am overwhelmed with sadness.

To all who are wise enough to consider my words: beware of the TAVR surgery. It is not all it’s cracked up to be.

Posted in Advice to the younger set, Be Strong!, Broken Heart, Determination, Divine Protection, Encouragement, Faith, Finding Your Purpose in Life, Humility, Journey to Truth, Memory, Modern Life, Mom, Moving On, Stand Tall, TAVR Surgery, The Mourning Heart, Wisdom | Leave a comment

My Tribute to Tonya Jo

My Tribute to Tonya Jo

By Richard Mabey Jr.

It was some time in the Summer of 2016 that I first connected with Tonya on the Private Message mode. But actually we had connected long before that. Tonya had been very supportive of my blog, for quite some time before she and I first connected on the Private Message medium.

Then, Tonya and I continued our friendship via email. We became very good friends. We became confidants for each other. I was to discover that Tonya had a lot of things in common. And, we had a lot of things that were not in common.

I think that Tonya is an incredibly kind and insightful person. She has a true gift of understanding human nature. I don’t think that she fully understands just how immense her talent to cut through the chase and see the bottom line of people’s motives, for the things that they do.

Tonya is one of the most interesting people, whom I have ever known. She has this incredible intrigue. At times she has a heart of gold, filled with a compassion that is wider than the Atlantic Ocean. At other times, she is tough as nails. Tonya cannot be conned. She is just too insightful and smart to ever be conned.

At times, Tonya is shy and quiet and unassuming. Then at other times, Tonya roars like a mountain lion. It is a most interesting aspect of Tonya’s personality.

Tonya has a very high degree of  inner strength that I have observed in very few people. It is a quiet strength. None the less, it is a very real strength.

Tonya has a deep belief in God. She is a very spiritual woman. It is a belief that goes beyond the average person’s faith. There is a quality within Tonya that resounds a very real knowingness of the existence of a Divine Being.

Over the years, Tonya has been a true friend to me. She has been very supportive of my blog. To which I am immensely grateful to her. She is also very wise. Many times, I have confided things to Tonya, asking her for her advice and insight into a problem that I was facing. Tonya is more insightful than Ann Landers and Dear Abby put together.

Tonya lives in Tennessee. It is a funny thing, I’ve never met Tonya, eyeball to eyeball. Sometime this summer, I plan on selling my home here in Central Florida and traveling about the USA. I do hope to meet Tonya, eyeball to eyeball, at that time.

Life is so strange. My blog drew Tonya and I together to become very good friends, I would say best friends. This modern world really has turned everything upside down.

In sacred humility, I bow my head and thank the good Lord that Tonya came into my life and became my very good friend. I really and truly do not know what I would do without her.

Posted in Acts of Kindness, Be Strong!, Believe in yourself!, Central Florida, Christianity, Compassion, Destiny, Determination, Divine Protection, Encouragement, Faith, Finding Your Purpose in Life, Friendship, Giving, Humility, Journey to Truth, Kindness, Leadership, Life's Dreams, Love one another, Modern Life, Oak Ridge, Sacrifice, Stand Tall, Tennessee, To thine own self be true., Tonya Jo, Wisdom | 1 Comment

Treatment for a theatrical play

Background for Theatrical Play

By Richard Mabey Jr.

Peter Marconi is a 65 year old barber, in the small town of Squirrel Valley, New Jersey. His barber shop is located right on the corner of Main Street and Oak Lane. Peter has been a barber all of his life. Peter’s father was a barber, as was his grandfather. All three generations of the Marconi family were barbers, in the very same barber shop that Peter now works in.

DESCRIPTION OF THE SET:
The set will be incredibly simple. There will be two barber’s chairs on center stage. Then, behind the barber’s chair, there will be a shelf for Peter’s scissors, razors, hair tonic, etcetera. At stage right will be three very plain and ordinary looking chairs for the men to wait to get their hair cut.

At stage left there will be an old black and white television set that stands on an old wooden table. The television is so old that it has rabbit ears antennas atop it.

THE CORE TRUTH OF PETER MARCONI:
Peter now works in the barber shop, by himself. It was a little over a year ago that the paramedics rushed Peter’s Dad out of the barber shop, with a heart attack. Peter now feels the loneliness of working alone in the barber shop. For Peter had begun working in the barber shop when he was only nine years old and in the fourth grade. Peter would walk directly from school to his Dad’s barber shop, every afternoon after school let out. At his Dad’s barber shop, Peter would sweep the floor and run errands for his father.

In the course of the play, men come in and out of the barber shop, to get their hair cut. Throughout the conversations that Peter has with these men, Peter shares his inner, heart-felt reflections that he feels a deep loneliness and emptiness in his life now. At 65, he wonders what he has really accomplished in his life. Nagging at Peter’s heart and his inner thoughts, is that Peter had always wanted to be a forest ranger. To work in the great outdoors. To be with nature. To have that cosmic connection with the great out of doors. In dialogue with some of the regular customers, Peter shares more and more of his sense of failure for not following his own dreams and perhaps being a bit too true to his father’s dream of having Peter work with him in the barber shop.

Sadly, Peter’s father is now in a nursing home. At times, when there are no customers in the barber shop, Peter talks to his father’s barber shop chair. Peter shares his concerns for his father’s health. And, he talks to the barber shop, as if it is his father being there, that he should have followed and pursued his dream to be a forest ranger.

There are hints of Peter’s personal life, throughout the play, through Peter’s dialogue with his customers and his talks with his father’s barber chair. Peter is a widow. His only son is a lawyer, who works in New York City. Peter does not see his son that much. Peter also has a daughter who lives in San Francisco. She is single and Peter constantly worries about her. From time to time, throughout the play, when he is alone in his barber shop, he tells his father’s empty barber chair that he needs to call his son or daughter. Peter picks up the phone, but never calls either one of his adult children.

In the beginning of Act II, sadly, Peter gets the news that his father has passed away. It comes in the way of a telephone call. When the fateful call comes through, Peter is alone in his barber shop. Right after he hangs up the phone, he sits down at his barber chair and breaks down and cries. Peter tries to compose himself. In his time of composing himself, he talks to his Dad’s barber chair and tells his Dad’s barber chair how much his father meant to him. But, he also tells his Dad’s barber chair how he really wanted to be a forest ranger, from the time he was a little boy.

At this point in time, I am not sure how I will end the play. But, it will end in an upbeat spirit.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment